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what is covalent bonding?
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jellycow95
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Joined: 14/05/2009 - 14:45
Posts: 35
what is covalent bonding?
jellycow95
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Joined: 14/05/2009 - 14:45
Posts: 35
what is covalent bonding?

what is covalent bonding? i dont get it.

ParinParikh123
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Joined: 20/04/2015 - 18:30
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Covalent bonding the bonding

Covalent bonding the bonding between two non metals. In this type of bonding, the electrons are shared. Covalent bonds have weak intermolecular forces therefore, low boiling and melting points. An example of a covalent bond is Nitrogen and Hydrogen sharing electrons to make ammonia. 

chemistrysubjec...
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Joined: 10/06/2007 - 22:31
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Hope this helps too.

http://www.revisionworld.com/gcse/chemistry/classifying-materials/bonding/covalent-bonding

Again, get back onliune if you need more help.

Coryandmitzy
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Joined: 23/02/2011 - 13:12
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Covalent Bonding

A covalent bond is a shared pair of electrons :)

iggypop15
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Joined: 29/04/2013 - 18:41
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COVALENT BONDING IS WHEN YOU

COVALENT BONDING IS WHEN YOU ARE TRYING TO SHARE A PAIR OF ELECTRONS BETWEEN TWO ATOMS. THIS WAY BOTH ATOMS HAVE A FULL OUTER SHELL.EACH COVALENT BOND CONTRIBUTES AN EXTRA SHARED ELECTRON FOR EACH ATOM. TAKE HYDROGEN H(LITTLE 2). THERE IS ONLY ONE ELECTRON IN HYDROGEN SO TO FILL THE FIRST OUTER SHELL YOU NEED A COVALENT BOND SO THAT THE FIRST SHELL IS COMPLETEenlightened

froggers
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Joined: 21/05/2013 - 23:06
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Covalent Bonding

covalent bonding is when two elements chemicallt join. it happens between a non-metal and a metal and they share electrons. the bond between them is very strong.

madeleine jane
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Joined: 22/05/2013 - 00:27
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covalent bonding

two atoms shar eletrons to give each other a full outer shell and example of this is methane

priya1997
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Joined: 08/06/2012 - 12:00
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you're all wrong.

you're all wrong.

this is off the bbc bitesize page:

"covalent bonding is bonding between two non-metals" 

examsmakemecry
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Joined: 23/05/2013 - 17:42
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Covalent Bonding

Covalent bonding ia where atoms share a pair of electrons. They need to share electron because they want to gain a full outer shell (to become stable). 

Hope that helps :)

Oscarlacoska
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Joined: 07/12/2011 - 17:07
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"you're all wrong" (priya1997)

They're not all wrong, it's just that they happened to miss out that bit of information.

This is because Covalent Bonding is when non-metals bond together, however one bond is created by two nuclei sharing a certain number of pairs of electrons. Then the attraction of the positive nuclei to the negative electrons in the middle of them causes this bond to exist. A group of covalently bonded atoms is called a molecule and most substances are simple, where there are only a few atoms in one molecule. Therefore in a mass of a covalently bonded substance, there are many molecules. In between the molecules there are very weak forces of attraction which take little energy to overcome and therefore a low temperature is required to break those forces and create a gas in which the molecules move in the gas. Covalent bonds are very strong. Giant covalent substances (like graphite, diamond and silica) have very high melting points because a mass of that is only one molecule and only made up of strong covalent bonds which need a lot of energy to overcome. 

Asia_D
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Joined: 24/05/2013 - 20:17
Posts: 1
Covalent Bonding

Well, i may not explain this properly but here i go

Non-metals can share electrons pairs between atoms, this is covalent bonding. Basically covalent bonding is a bond between atoms where a pair of electrons are shared.

hope this helped smiley

 

 

 

 

Altavia
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Joined: 17/04/2015 - 02:22
Posts: 1
Covalent Bonding

Covalent Bonding is a bond with two non metals

 

petrraa_i
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Joined: 26/08/2017 - 01:27
Posts: 1
chemistry

Hey,

       A covalent bond is an electrostatic force of attraction between two nuclei which share atoms.

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