Title

AQA GCSE Physical Education (PE)
Quick revise

These links relate to the AQA GCSE exam for Physical Edcucation covering

  • Short Course (4891) – for exams June 2010 onwards and certification June 2010 onwards
  • Full Course (4892) – for exams June 2010 onwards and certification June 2011 onwards
  • Double Award (4894) – selected units from June 2010 onwards, remaining units and certification from June 2011 onwards
  • Link to AQA page
Description Short Course Full Course Double Course External Links
1. Knowledge and Understanding
for the Active Participant
       

Individual differences (Students will need to understand that people are individuals with different needs according to the following factors)

       

Age -

  • Physical maturity, suitability for certain activities prior to maturity.
  • The effects of performance at various ages up to and including retirement.
  • Understanding what their bodies can and cannot do as they go through periods of development
LINK LINK LINK  

Disability -

  • How physical, mental, temporary or permanent disability can affect participation and performance in physical activity
coming soon coming soon coming soon  

Gender -

  • How physique, metabolism and hormones can affect participation and performance in physical activity
LINK LINK LINK  

Physique -

  • Body typing as Endomorph, Mesomorph and Ectomorph
  • The most suitable body type for a particular sport or playing role/position within that sport
  • Knowledge of the particular sports for each type and the reasons for their suitability
LINK LINK LINK  

Environment -

  • How weather, pollution, altitude, humidity, and access to facilities and terrain can affect the participant and their performance in physical activity
LINK LINK LINK  

Risk and challenge -

  • Risk assessment and risk control for themselves and others to participate safely in different environments
LINK LINK LINK  

Activity levels

  • The effects and needs of different demands from different activities
LINK LINK LINK  

Training

  • How funds and the time available affect the participant and their performance in physical activity
LINK LINK LINK  

The demands of performance

       

Fatigue / Stress - (How and when fatigue and stress occur, and the effects on skill level, including the following:

  • Personality/emotions
  • Tension / anxiety
  • Aggression
  • Motivation / arousal
  • Boredom / tedium
  • Feedback / criticism.

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Injury

  • Precautions – how to prevent injury
  • Correct techniques and safe practice
  • Clothing/equipment
  • Rules/codes of conduct
n/a LINK LINK  

The difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise

  • Aerobic respiration in the presence of oxygen, summarised as: glucose + oxygen → energy + carbon dioxide + water
  • Anaerobic respiration in the absence of oxygen, summarised as: glucose → energy + lactic acid.
  • The function and role of the blood in the transport of oxygen, glucose and waste products, body temperature control and protection, link to aerobic and anaerobic.
  • Oxygen debt as the result of muscles respiring anaerobically during vigorous exercise and producing a mild poison called lactic acid.
  • The recovery process from vigorous exercise.
n/a

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Characteristics and benefits of leisure and recreation

  • Leisure – free time when you can do what you choose, a time to take part in physical activity or in sport.
  • Recreation – time to relax, do something active and healthy an active aspect of leisure.
  • Physical recreation – playing for intrinsic rather than extrinsic rewards.
  • Outdoor recreation – activity associated with challenge in the natural environment.
  • Lifetime/lifelong sports – which can be carried on throughout life.
n/a LINK LINK  
         
2. Linking physical activity with diet, work and rest for personal health and a balanced healthy lifestyle        
Health, fitness and a healthy active lifestyle        
  • Fitness as one aspect of general health. Differences between health and fitness and how they are related.
LINK LINK LINK  
  • The adoption of a healthy active lifestyle, for example: jobs involving manual labour and jobs involving being on feet all day.
LINK LINK LINK  
  • The concept of ‘fitness’ as the capability of the body to meet the daily demands made upon it with some comfort/without stress.
LINK LINK LINK  
  • Fitness capability in terms of the components that serve the body in different degrees, at different times to meet different demands, either separately or in combination, including the following:
    • Strength – dynamic, explosive, static
    • Speed
    • Power
    • Cardiovascular endurance / stamina
    • Muscular endurance / stamina
    • Flexibility / Suppleness
    • Agility
    • Balance
    • Co-ordination
    • Reaction time
    • Timing
    • Skeletal and muscular systems need to be understood in the above contexts, where applicable.

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Training

       
  • Specific exercise or training programmes including advantages and disadvantages, training and practice to improve fitness / skills / techniques, such as:
    • Weight training
    • Circuit training
    • Interval training
    • Fartlek training
    • Continuous training.

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

  • Aspects of training
    • Principles of training – including sessions and programmes
    • Threshold
    • Specificity
    • Progression
    • Overload (including frequency, intensity and duration)
    • Reversibility
    • Repetition / sets
    • Training zones
    • Rest / recovery
    • Environment e.g. altitude, warm weather
    • The training year – pre-season, competition, closed season

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 
Diet        
  • Through a balanced diet the body receives the nourishment it needs to maintain physical health
  • Knowledge and understanding is limited to: proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, water/fluids, fibre/roughage
  • Causes and results on the body of dietary imbalance/deficiency with particular reference to obesity and anorexia
  • Special diets for different types and levels of active participation; to include carbohydrate loading and high protein diets.

n/a

LINK

LINK

 

         
3. Making informed decisions about getting involved in a lifetime of healthy physical activities that suit their needs        
School influences        
  • National Curriculum requirements
  • The Healthy Schools Programme and PSHE.
LINK LINK LINK  
  • PESSCL (Specialist Sports Colleges, gifted and talented programme, Step into Sport and the TOP LINK programme, school and club links, swimming and coaching)
  • PESSYP (New sporting opportunities, the ‘5 hour offer’, increased coaching opportunities, national networks of school sport, range of sporting activities, Young Ambassadors, National Talent Orientation Camp, The National Sport Week)
n/a coming soon coming soon  

Healthy eating

  • Balanced diet for the balance of good health
  • Whole School Food Policy
  • Standards and requirements for school lunch
  • Food choices.

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Physical Activity

  • Physical Activity Policy
  • Structured two hours physical activity
  • The range of extra-curricular activities.
LINK LINK LINK  

Extra-curricular opportunities and provision

  • Attitudes of staff (both positive and negative) and experience of staff influencing the range and type of provision made
  • The extent and quality of facilities available – challenges where facilities are limited and the range of opportunities for well-resourced schools
  • Outside visits to other sporting providers, specialist facilities and specific activity providers (such as ice rinks, ten pin bowling or dry ski slopes)
  • Links to local sports clubs/providers for a range of activities and different types of provision such as health clubs, golf clubs etc.
  • Providing a range of extra-curricular activities/representative teams, clubs and societies which can extend beyond the traditional sporting models to include other leisure and recreational opportunities.

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Emotional health and wellbeing        
  • Vulnerable individuals and groups
  • Bullying policies
  • Behaviour and rewards policies
  • Confidential pastoral support systems.
n/a coming soon coming soon  
Cultural and Social factors        

Leisure Time

  • Opportunities available – reasons for increased leisure time, e.g. greater unemployment, shorter working week, technological advances including more labour-saving devices. Growth in the leisure industry (public and private sector) to provide for this greater need.
  • Providers and users – local authority provision specifically targeting particular ‘user groups’ and making concessions and allowances for them.
n/a LINK LINK  
Fairness and personal and social responsibility
  • Concepts of etiquette and fairness – examples of where this is expected to take place within different sports
  • The link with rules – adherence to the rules and spirit of the game, including responding positively to the officials in charge (teachers/coaches, etc.) affecting safety.
n/a LINK LINK  
Social groupings
  • Peers – positive and negative effects of peer pressure on participation
  • Family – positive and negative effects of family pressure on participation
  • Gender – positive and negative effects of gender on participation in sport including wider sporting opportunities and involvement in management and officials’ roles
  • Ethnicity – awareness and appreciation of their own and other cultures in relation to physical activities.
n/a

LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Opportunities and pathways available for becoming or remaining involved in physical activities

       
Roles – provision, choice and pathway opportunities
  • The different roles that schools may encourage candidates to adopt, eg performer, leader/coach, organiser, choreographer or official
  • Being involved in increasingly complex and challenging tasks and activity and following career and volunteering pathways; pursuing roles in sport through volunteering.
coming soon coming soon coming soon  
Accredited courses and qualifications
  • Examination-based courses, accreditation, sports performance awards, proficiency testing and awards.
coming soon coming soon coming soon  
Cross-curricular possibilities
  • Cross-curricular work, e.g. health awareness, social education issues.
coming soon coming soon coming soon  
Vocational opportunities
  • Sports performer – differences between professional and amateur, open sport and the ways in which ‘loopholes’ are found for amateur performers
  • Careers such as PE teacher, coach, trainer, physiotherapist, sports management.
n/a LINK LINK  
         
International and other factors        
The media
  • The Press
  • Television
  • The Internet
  • Radio
  • How the media helps to give an understanding of performance and participation.
  • Different types of output eg informative, educational (e.g. coaching series or documentaries), instructive and entertainment
  • Director’s/writer’s influence on what might be seen or said.

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Sponsorship
  • Range and scope and the effects of sponsorship
  • Advantages and disadvantages to the sponsor, the performer and the sport/activity
  • Ease of obtaining sponsorship at various levels and at different profile levels of sport. Examples of acceptable and unacceptable types of sponsorship.

LINK

LINK

LINK

 

Competitions
  • Types of competitions used in all levels of sport, including knock-out, ladders and combination events which involve qualifying criteria.
  • Different levels including examples of specific competitions and competition formats.
coming soon coming soon coming soon  
International sport and events
  • Advantages and disadvantages of hosting major international sporting competitions or events such as the Olympic Games and other high profile events.
n/a coming soon coming soon  
The link with role models
  • The importance of role models in setting participation trends or shaping attitudes and the effects of this on growth/declining popularity.
n/a coming soon coming soon  
Health, safety and the well-being of others
  • Play safe, and health and safety legislation and guidance
  • Correct technique when performing a skill
  • Use of appropriate footwear and clothing to prevent injury
  • Carrying, lifting and lowering – guidance on correct techniques.

n/a

LINK

LINK

 

Rules relating to sport and equipment
  • The link to safety – students should understand the roles that rules play in making sure that taking part is as safe as possible.
n/a LINK LINK  
Science and ICT
  • For planning improvement and involvement in physical activity
  • Performance analysis software and hardware
  • ICT to record and analyse performance; to track involvement and improvement; linking with other curriculum areas
  • Interactive tools and devices – including games consoles
  • Technological innovations eg the video official, ‘Cyclops’ at Wimbledon, ‘Hawkeye’ at cricket matches.
n/a coming soon coming soon  

 

Rate: 
0

No votes yet